Corey Bartle-Sanderson collaboration with Sam Blackwood ‘Untitled’ 2020, part one in a series. Materials: Galvanised steel street sign, oil paint, digital print, cable ties, various chewing gum, cigarette ends, rose, take away menus, key ring filled with dust from studio floor.

Corey Bartle-Sanderson collaboration with Sam Blackwood

Corey Bartle-Sanderson in collaboration
with Sam Blackwood

Sam Meredith, Crevice.

Sam Meredith

Sam Meredith

Sam Meredith, Crevice.
Sam Meredith, Crevice.

I saw the top of a blue plastic bag poking out of a hole in a large hollowed out tree trunk, upon closer inspection I saw how humans had been stuffing it full of rubbish to the point a plastic bottle had even fallen out the other end. The trunk was bursting at the seams with litter. It made me think about the potential for objects to be stashed in crevices and how in this instance the tree serves a new function. One that is at odds with its natural reason for being. 

I have been watching tutorials recently on making improvised birdhouses and I like the idea of making something that brings solidarity with the non-human to the foreground. Objects that sink into their surroundings, situated in places to avoid human contact and offer comfort and shelter. I hope that these objects become all kinds of things to all kinds of beings, a landing strip for a fly, a pit stop for a squirrel, a nest for a bird or a surface for dust and dirt to collect on. 

The sun had just gone down and the park was quiet except for the distant bells of the park ranger signaling it was time for all to leave. I sized up a premium log from the freshly cut tree and lifted it hastily, it carried more weight than I thought and the bark scraped my hand a little. The log is coming home, to be worked on, then after some time will be returned to the park. The install will take place under the cover of darkness.

 

 

Jordan Mouzouris, Chadwick Road Wings, found materials.

Jordan Mouzouris

Jordan Mouzouris

Oh you, you, you haven’t heard about the wings of chadwick road? 
Well this is an ode, an ode. That’s right, 
two cerulean wings laced up to the sky. 
You used to be able to find them in the night, out of sight, 
illuminated by the car headlight. 

This is an ode to the wings of chadwick road,
two cerulean wings vanished and everything that came with them, 
vanished.
Obliterated into glittery dust. 

I cycled on my bike looking for them, 
two cerulean wings haunting me. 
This is an ode, an ode to the wings of chadwick road.

Celeste McEvoy, Bridgehouse Souvenirs, scanned objects, inkjet print on recycled paper, 841mm x 594 mm.

Celeste McEvoy

Celeste McEvoy

‘Bridgehouse Souvenirs’ acts as an archive to objects found in Bridgehouse Meadows, Lewisham. The record of this site-specific gathering operates as an ethnographic collection and an exploration of hierarchy. 

The relics are valued for their specific aesthetic intervention in the area as well as their residual history. Each memento questions an object’s ability to simultaneously retain its status as democratic and display its newly attributed value from the archival setting.

Isobel Mei, Scrap for Parts 1. Contact C5 Inkjet prints on recycled cardboard, emulsion paint, pigment, voicemail audio.

Isobel Mei

Isobel Mei

‘Scrap for Parts’ is:
A monument to pending messages. 
A comment on distanced contact. 
A friend to visit or call.
A form that manifests over time. 
It is also an evolving installation based in the windows of a disused shop unit in Deptford, South London. 
Responding to an existing heap of untouched mail gathering inside, the site will act as a cumulative depository for patchy exchanges of stuff leftover and contact attempts. The work will play out in ‘Parts’ via posted material and voicemail.

Dani Smith, Given & Trasmitted, A2 Day-Glo Fly Posters

Dani Smith

Dani Smith

‘And just as they seem to be occupied with revolutionizing themselves and things, creating something that did not exist before, precisely in such epochs of revolutionary crisis they anxiously conjure up the spirits of the past to their service, borrowing from them names, battle slogans, and costumes in order to present this new scene in world history in time-honored disguise and borrowed language.’
– The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte. Karl Marx 1852

In Given & Transmitted, the words of a long dead man exist within an ecosystem of irrelevant posters, severely damaged since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. There are no punters, there is no event, the hotline has gone cold.

Anna Reading

Anna Reading

Local Haunt - Tile

Local Haunts

Local Haunt - Tile

‘The events of human life, be they public or private, are so intimately bound up with architecture, that the majority of observers can reconstruct nations or individuals in the full reality of their behaviour from the remnants of their public monuments or the exhibition of their domestic remains.’ 1

‘In my head, I build maps of towns and cities based on these interactions with objects. Maybe they’ve gone now, or completely changed but “Memories are motionless”, Bachelard in The Poetics of Space. Public space co-ordinated via objects, (maybe I could create some type of orienteering event.)’ 2

I’m interested in this human placement of objects in public space – a conscious decision to not directly litter, thinking of creative solutions against dropping something directly onto the floor. The best example off the top of my head: a snickers wrapper cable tied to a fence in Wallsend.

-Treating these discarded, broken, used materials with sensitivity, care, support, allowing them a new energy.

-Adding value or poking fun at ideas of value.

-Objects performing themselves, living out their purpose, being reassigned a purpose, becoming part of the detritus of objects.

Local haunts
   Locally haunting
      Detritus of objects
         Social detritus.

Thinking about non artists interventions in public space all the time:
Creative littering or discarding objects in a way which interacts with permanent fixtures, an empty drinks can pierced onto a fence post, a used wrapper cable tied to a pole, cigarette ends filling up holes in stone.

Local haunts aims to encourage these interactions with public space and think about how we can interact with something in our street, or how that can interact with us hopefully creating moments of curiosity and contemplation for people in passing.

The Project will run through July, across seven different locations in London, works will change for various reasons. (weather/public interaction), works will be documented throughout the project to record change.


1 Honoré de Balzac, The Quest of the Absolute
2 iPhone note, 23/04/2019.